Policies

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5 Responses to “Policies”

  1. mdthier  on December 14th, 2011 at 10:44 pm

    I just received the information about the new “branding-logo” of the Museum, the upside-down A. If you actually paid someone to come up with this lame brained idea, you wasted your money. Whoever thought of this has his head up you know where, which might explain the fact that the A is upside down. It will surely generate more snickers and befuddlement than positive feelings about the Museum. I hope that it is not an indication of how out of touch you are with the community that you are trying to attract to the Museum. I predict that it will go the way of New Coke.

  2. laurenb  on February 14th, 2012 at 12:34 pm

    It was interesting to see that this museum held performances depicting Asian culture as well as Asian artwork. Performances encompass dance, music, storytelling, theater and more which allow the viewer to engulf themselves in understanding artistic techniques. I also liked how the museum organized art by region.

  3. Elsie Krussfix  on March 24th, 2012 at 8:40 am

    The Maharaja exhibit was interesting although I began to question the validity of information provided by the museum tour guide…..at one point he referred to “Madonna” (during the tour), a known television and radio personality. Museum rep’s are intended to support art & history (why) representative to the museum advertised a commercial commodity that has over the course of 20 years plus been sued and lost countless times for copyright infringement, replicating and duplicating original artists/authors creative project/work while reaping high profits marketing coy imitations is alarming. It put a spin on the tour and after a group of us decided to not trust the source.

  4. martinlbny05  on January 23rd, 2013 at 6:20 pm

    CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR COMING EXHIBIT AND MAY THE GODS LOOK KINDLY ON YOUR EFFORTS AND REWARD YOU WITH LARGE RESPONSIVE AUDIENCES…..I HAD THE GOOD FORTUNE OF VISITING THE TERRA COTTA ARMY
    IN XIAN DURING MY1980 VISIT AND WAS FASCINATED BY THE COMPLEXITY AND ATTENTION TO DETAIL THAT THE
    ARTISTS BROUGHT TO THE INSTALLATION.
    ISIT POSSIBLE THAT YOUR MISSING WARRIOR WENT AWOL
    TO VISIT THE EAST COAST SO AS TO SEE WHAT SOME OF HIS COLLEAGUES BROUGHT EAST FOR A REUNION…
    MARTIN

  5. Frosty Plum  on January 27th, 2013 at 10:36 am

    The new logo stinks. It conveys all the wrong messages: (1) It implies that “Asian” and “Asian art” are “inverted”. Has the museum administration been so busy finishing dissertations and courting South Bay donors that it forgot to read Edward Said? (2) It conveys institutional insecurity and weakness (i.e. it invites the question of, What was wrong with the old logo?). Self-confident institutions don’t change their logos. (3) It conveys the sense that “Asian” is somehow inscrutable, which is exactly opposite the AAM’s mission! (4) The upside-down image is one of the oldest clich├ęs around–cf. dig into the ground to get to China, on the other side of the world; the “world upside down” image of Japan, etc. As someone who has actually worked with the institution and wishes only the best for it, it really saddens me to see it being cheapened and made to look so provincial, which is what the logo change ultimately accomplishes.


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